More of us could work in part-time roles if they were designed better

logo-a0073854423c0c04eddfa9074f700eaf

File 20170822 4964 vnqyv1
Part-time roles become difficult if that employee is the only source of knowledge, contact or sign-off.
http://www.shutterstock.com

Natalie Smith, Queensland University of Technology

Lisa was a young accountant with plenty of experience, solid references and was looking for work. She approached a large accounting firm she had previously worked for in another city in the hope of working with them again.

They were interested, except one thing stood in her way – she could only work part-time. Despite having award winning flexible work policies, this accounting firm wouldn’t employ her, citing the role could not be done on a part-time basis.

Lisa (not her real name) is typical of the 24 people I interviewed as part of my research. These men and women had requested to move to part-time roles in legal, information technology, accounting and consulting firms, having previously worked full-time. Continue reading “More of us could work in part-time roles if they were designed better”

ICCDPP 2017: The World’s Career Development Think Tank

Imagine a hall filled by a selection of leading thinkers and doers, sharing ideas, challenges, professional practices, and national policies reflecting their nations’ aspirations for educational and labour market outcomes. They all met in Seoul at the 8th Symposium of International Centre for Career Development Public Policy (ICCDPP), hosted by the the Republic of Korea’s Department of Education and KRIVET.  Evidently, career development is high on the agenda of many nations seeking to improve the employability of their citizens. Continue reading “ICCDPP 2017: The World’s Career Development Think Tank”

A-GRADES is Live!

The Round 1 A-GRADES questionnaire is now live and awaiting student and graduate participants from any degree or discipline both domestic or international. Access to the online A-GRADES questionnaire can be found here. It takes no more than 10 minutes to complete. Your participation is vital for the construction, validation, and production of this personal employability measure. Continue reading “A-GRADES is Live!”

CDAA Keynote Speakers Podcast

The Career Development Association of Australia brought four keynote speakers to its 2017 annual conference of members and industry bodies.  Listen to brief interviews with Dr Ryan Duffy, Dr Ann Villiers, Dr Peter McIlveen, and Ms Marayke Jonkers, to learn more about their ideas for the field of career development.

Psychology of Working

ACCELL International Fellow, Dr Ryan Duffy, and ACCELL Research Director, Dr Peter McIlveen, emphasize issues associated with the psychology of working, decent work, unemployment, and evidence-based practice.


Acknowledgement: Thanks to CDAA Communications Officer, Georgia Kelly-Bakker, who recorded and produced the podcast.

Data Collections

ACCELL is currently collecting survey data for several research projects.  Please contribute to our work by completing one or more of the data collection sites linked below.

A-GRADES

The project A-GRADES (Australian Graduates Employability Scale) aims to create a career development tool for students and graduates. It is intended that the tool be used to ascertain personal qualities related to career management and employment. Also, the tool may be used within learning activities that develop students’ career management knowledge and skills, and their preparations for employment. The tool will be useful to students, graduates, and university staff (e.g., career practitioners, work-integrated learning specialists).

Round 2 data collection for the purposes of validation of the A-GRADES measure is underway. If you are a current university student or a university graduate of any degree then please enter the A-GRADES survey site here.

Decent Work and Location

The notion of “decent work” refers to fair, safe, and equitable conditions of employment as defined by the International Labour Organisation (ILO). This project will contribute to that international study and also explore a range of factors, such as psychological flexibility, career adaptability, decent work, meaningfulness of work, work engagement, place attachment, and job satisfaction, that influence the wellbeing and retention of workers in non-metropolitan areas of Australia. If you are a current university student or a university graduate of any degree then please enter the survey site here.