How are educators adapting to the challenges of COVID-19?

COVID-19 has changed the way we work, live, and learn. Most educational institutions have moved to some type of alternative education provision.  Research is required to better understand how these unprecedented challenges and ways of working affect educators and their vital work.

The effects on educators are being investigated by Associate Professor Petrea Redmond and colleagues at the University of Southern Queensland, Australia.

Educators around the world are completing an online survey for this research. The survey includes educators working in a wide range of educational sectors: Early Childhood, K – 12, Higher Education, Vocational Education and workplace trainers.

The survey takes, on average, approximately 5 minutes. If you are willing to contribute, here is the link: https://tinyurl.com/y73yj5fe

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“We need evidence to understand educators’ experiences, and to inform educational policies and workplace practices”, says Associate Professor Petrea Redmond

A snowballing technique is being used to gather more participants, so feel free to pass on the link to colleagues or your professional networks.

This research project has ethical approval from the University of Southern Queensland (Human Research Ethics Approval Number – H20REA103).

Future Teachers’ Career Adaptability, Self-Efficacy and Optimism

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Find the full research article here:

McLennan, B., McIlveen, P., & Perera, H. N. (2017). Pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy mediates the relationship between career adaptability and career optimism. Teaching and Teacher Education, 63, 176-185. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2016.12.022

Teacher Personality Links with Job Satisfaction and Work Engagement

 

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Find the complete research article here:

Perera, H. N., Granziera, H., & McIlveen, P. (2018). Profiles of teacher personality and relations with teacher self-efficacy, work engagement, and job satisfaction. Personality and Individual Differences, 120, 171-178. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2017.08.034

What Will You Be When You Grow Up?

Recent newspaper stories about career development learning in young children have sparked a national discussion. When is too soon? When is it too late? When is the best time for children to start learning about the world of work and their future careers?  It’s a moot point. Kids start learning about work as they watch and listen to the world around them.  Kids will be what they see. Continue reading “What Will You Be When You Grow Up?”